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Important Safety Information

If you have a pelvic infection, get infections easily, or have certain
cancers, don’t use Skyla.
Less than 1% of users get a serious pelvic
infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
If you have persistent pelvic or stomach pain or
if Skyla comes out, tell your healthcare
provider (HCP)... continue reading below

*OB/GYN=obstetrician/gynecologist.
*OB/GYN=obstetrician/gynecologist.
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Skyla Indication

Skyla (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is a hormone-releasing IUD that prevents pregnancy for up to 3 years.

Skyla Important Safety Information
  • If you have a pelvic infection, get infections easily, or have certain cancers, don't use Skyla. Less than 1% of users get a serious pelvic infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
  • If you have persistent pelvic or stomach pain or if Skyla comes out, tell your healthcare provider (HCP). If Skyla comes out, use back-up birth control.
  • Skyla may attach to or go through the uterus (perforation) and cause other problems. The risk of perforation is increased if Skyla is inserted while you are breastfeeding. Talk to your HCP.
  • Pregnancy while using Skyla is uncommon but can be life threatening and may result in loss of pregnancy or fertility.
  • Ovarian cysts may occur but usually disappear.
  • Bleeding and spotting may increase in the first 3 to 6 months and remain irregular. Periods over time usually become shorter, lighter, or may stop.

Skyla does not protect against HIV or STDs.

Only you and your HCP can decide if Skyla is right for you. Skyla is available by prescription only.

For important risk and use information about Skyla, please see the Full Prescribing Information.

Mirena Indications & Usage

Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is a hormone-releasing IUD that prevents pregnancy for up to 5 years. Mirena also treats heavy periods in women who choose intrauterine contraception. Mirena is recommended for women who have had a child.

Mirena Important Safety Information
  • If you have a pelvic infection, get infections easily, or have certain cancers, don't use Mirena. Less than 1% of users get a serious pelvic infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
  • If you have persistent pelvic or stomach pain or if Mirena comes out, tell your healthcare provider (HCP). If Mirena comes out, use back-up birth control.
  • Mirena may attach to or go through the uterus (perforation) and cause other problems. The risk of perforation is increased if Mirena is inserted while you are breastfeeding. Talk to your HCP.
  • Pregnancy while using Mirena is uncommon but can be life threatening and may result in loss of pregnancy or fertility.
  • Ovarian cysts may occur but usually disappear.
  • Bleeding and spotting may increase in the first 3 to 6 months and remain irregular. Periods over time usually become shorter, lighter, or may stop.
    • Mirena does not protect against HIV or STDs.

      Available by prescription only.

      For important risk and use information about Mirena, please see the Full Prescribing Information.